The Good, The Fad, and The Ugly

The tech industry is fast-paced. Innovation is constantly shaking things up, and developers need to evolve to survive. That being said, there are just as many false starts, frenzies, and faux pas as any other commercial endeavor. The tricky business of teasing out quality from clutter is what we’d like to outline below.

The Good

Good web development is timeless. That’s not to say it can’t be on the bleeding edge of developer technique – but it should do so with grace. Not flaunting, not flashy, but fine. Designs that feel clean, and relevant, and ergonomic are common elements that set a page apart from the masses.

Web developers with merit avoid kitschy ornamentation and tired, throwaway content. They utilize personal style and project confidence. They represent their clients’ brands accurately. Most of all, they use data to drive decision-making.

To help illustrate, we’ll address some less desirable factors that pollute the webscape.

The Fad

Fads happen when a company comes up with something neat, and everyone jumps on the bandwagon. Soon the innovation becomes commonplace, and banal. The technique loses its luster and everyone starts to look the same.

Like slap bracelets and hair crimping, everybody was doing it and now it looks dated. In web design terms, indented menus with rounded corners and no shading. Following the fads doesn’t improve your brand, and won’t age well.

The Ugly

These techniques are especially significant in that they are dated, nonsensical, and annoying. Think pop-up flash ads. These were annoying then, and are still annoying now. They aren’t as flashy, but they still restrict content unnecessarily.

As they make a comeback, users – and web design companies – need to question the authenticity of the brand. Is this technique really something they should get behind? Or can they do better?

Expect Excellence

The web is a frontier of style and invention, so don’t settle for less. Don’t settle for something that feels regurgitated or empty. Because odds are, it probably is. If they give you the razzle-dazzle, ask for their data.

Engage developers that challenge themselves, and are constantly looking towards the horizon.

 

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